Monthly Archives: April 2015

BSA Bourdieu Study Group Event: Capital: In All Its Forms

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                     London

                   Tuesday 30th June 2015

Keynotes: Professor Mike Savage (London School of Economics), Professor Derek Robbins (University of East London) Dr Lisa Mckenzie (London School of Economics), Dr Nicola Ingram (University of Bath), Dr Emma Jackson (Goldsmiths College), Dr Derron Wallace  (Brandeis University), Dr Ciaran Burke (Ulster University) and Annable Wilson (Cardiff University)

Capital has traditionally been a central concept within sociology since its foundation. Most widely, it was associated with Karl Marx’ political philosophy and its concern with the relationship between capital and labour. More recently, the concept of different forms of capital and the wider system of its exchanges has been connected with Bourdieu. Bourdieu extended the concept of capital to not only include its monetary exchange assets, but to also incorporate a broader understanding of the ways different forms of culture and networks – as exchange resources – could be enacted upon and transformed within and across different fields. According to Bourdieu, capital could be accumulated in different forms: materialised, incorporated and embodied. Whereas economic capital could be instantly inherited, the accumulations and reproduction of objectified and embodied capitals could take time. Moreover, the accumulation, distribution and recognition of these capitals were dependent upon structures of the social world that agents inhabited (Bourdieu, 1986).

Bourdieu’s large body of work, and in particular his forms of capital, have been open to multiple interpretations. Some argue that Bourdieu’s concepts are still relevant and important to contemporary empirical research – often applying his concepts to societies, issues and socio-demographic categories that Bourdieu had rarely, if ever, addressed. Others maintain that researchers need to closely follow an orthodox Bourdieusian tradition and not extend his theoretical approach to construct new forms of capital. However, there are also those who have extended Bourdieu’s theoretical approach to their own work, but are ready to call attention to what they believe has been a misapprehension of Bourdieu.

The Bourdieu study group has always endeavoured to encourage open debate and discussion around Bourdieu’s own work, as well as that of other researchers and academics who have drawn upon Bourdieu. This event will bring together many of our past speakers and those that have been present at former events to discuss and review Bourdieu’s concepts of capital: what they are, why and how to extend and apply them to contemporary society and how not to misinterpreted Bourdieu.

The BSA have opened up a reserve list for the BSA Bourdieu study group’s forthcoming event: ‘Capital: in all its forms’. If you would like to added to the reserve list please email the BSA events term directly: events@britsoc.org.uk